The Impact of Catholic Schools

Following are a few interesting statistics on the reality of a Catholic education.

Those who attended a Catholic elementary school are more likely than those who did not to say the following are “very” important to their sense of what it means to be a Catholic:

  • Helping those in need (54% who attended Catholic schools compared to 44% who did not)
  • Living a life consistent with Church teaching (46% who attended Catholic schools compared to 30% who did not)
  • Having devotion to Mary (41% who attended Catholic schools compared to 35% who did not)
  • Receiving the Eucharist (71% who attended Catholic schools compared to 58% who did not)

Those who attended a Catholic high school are more likely than those who did not to say that the following are “very” important to their sense of what it means to be a Catholic:

  • Helping those in need (56% who attended Catholic schools compared to 46% who did not)
  • Living a life consistent with Church teaching (49% who attended Catholic schools compared to 33% who did not) 
  • Meaningfulness of Holy Orders (62% who attended Catholic schools compared to 45% who did not)
  • More likely to believe the Eucharist is most meaningful to them (37% who attended Catholic schools compared to 22% who did not)
  • Men who attended a Catholic high school are more likely to have considered the vocation of priest or religious brother (32% overall).
  • Women who attended a Catholic high school are among the most likely to have considered the vocation of a nun or religious sister (25% overall).

Interestingly, 63% of those who attended a Catholic high school “strongly” agree that they are proud to be Catholic, compared to 54% who did not attend.

And 64% of those who attended a Catholic high school say their Catholic faith is at least “among the most important parts” of their life, compared to 40% of those who did not attend.

Keeping Catholic schools “viable and affordable” leaps out from the data as a pastoral priority.

Research from the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate, Georgetown University, February 2008

Site by Solutio